No matter the age, from wee little ones to the oldest grandchildren, do not let this holiday pass without capitalizing on it for the Lord. May this post whet your appetite and get you thinking about things you could do.

Remember that parts of this story can be difficult for the youngest, so choose parts and ideas to share with your grandchildren’s ages, personality, and interests in mind. Regardless of how old they are, they can catch your excitement and joy that Jesus is alive!

It may be hard to think of things to do with the littlest of our grandchildren, yet even they can have the story shared. When our grandchildren were newborn and toddler age, we sang and read to them. There are wonderful books and songs out there. Think back to when you were young or check with your preschool department at church.

An example sung to the tune of Happy Birthday is “I’m so glad for Easter. It’s such a happy day! Jesus came back to life, He’s alive today! I’m so glad for Easter. It’s such a happy day! Let’s tell the Good News – Jesus still lives today!”[David C. Cook] Sing this one to the tune of Are you Sleeping? “Sweet little one, sing for joy; Easter day! Celebrate! Jesus is alive! Jesus is alive! Sing for joy, sing for joy.” You can also make up songs using easy preschool tunes.

Below is a list of activities and ideas to do in person or virtually. Be creative and have fun, adapting and modifying them so they work for you.

  1. Coloring Eggs – as you spend time together, talk about when you were young and how you celebrated Easter. What were those traditions that mean so much to you and you desire to pass on?
  2. Egg Hunt – there are so many ways to do an egg hunt. Stress that while finding the eggs brings so much joy, the women finding the tomb empty brought rejoicing that is still celebrated today.
  3. Verse Egg Hunt – choose an age appropriate Easter scripture verse such as John 3:16, Romans 5:8, or Luke 24:6a. Divide the verse up into words or phrases that will fit onto slips of paper that will go into a plastic egg. On one side of the paper write the word or words depending on how many slips you are using. On the other side, draw pictures in sequence telling the Easter story. You may need to start at Palm Sunday depending on how many pictures you need. Be sure to have the words and pictures match the correct sequence for the words. Fill the eggs and hide them. Allow the grandchildren to find, empty, and put the verse together in order. You can make more than one set using different colored eggs for each set. Go over the verse meaning with them.
  4. Easter Story Rocks – collect some smooth rocks, paint symbols of Easter on each rock. Discuss the symbols as you choose them and paint them. Go to crosswalk.com to read the article “What is Easter: Understanding the History and Symbols” by Susan E. Richardson.
  5. Acts of Kindness – Help them think through what they could do to show kindness to someone else. Think Romans 5:8.
  6. Bible – read the biblical account from an age appropriate Bible. Focus on “Jesus is alive” for the young ones.
  7. Attend Sunrise or Church Service Together – discuss your favorite Easter hymn or song, your favorite scripture, and/or memory of church. 
  8. Watch an Easter DVD – examples are The Passion or The Chosen. These are good for the older grandchildren.
  9. Books – there are great resources out there for every age. Here are a few of my favorites:
    • Forever Falls by Glen Keane
    • Benjamin’s Box by Melody Carlson (you can purchase here)
    • The Resurrection Eggs in Rhyme and Song by Miss Pattycake
    • For God So Loved the World by Dandi Daley Mackall
  10. Gifting Books – consider buying two of a particular book, especially for the long distance grandchildren. When you read the book virtually to them, they have their own copy to hold and see.
  11. Scripture Treasure Hunt – see how many scriptures you can find together that talk about the Easter account. Great for older grandchildren who have heard the story many times before. I had my older grandchildren help me make up my own “resurrection eggs” set with items. We searched the scriptures for objects to place inside the eggs. We came up with 36 objects. The oldest is a teenager now and still enjoys opening the eggs. Now he is often the one who leads the discussion about the enclosed objects.
  12. Go Shopping – you can purchase a new outfit or part of an outfit – always check with parents first. Talk about how you prepare yourself for Easter, especially your heart. It is about the inner spirit not the outward clothing.
  13. Writing – challenge the older grandchildren to write an eye-witness account as one of the people who were there – soldier, women, disciple, so forth. What would they have seen, heard, felt? The younger ones could do a drawing instead.
  14. Passover Meal – prepare and eat a seder meal, good for the older grandchildren. Great resources on line to help you.
  15. Meaningful Dinner Conversations – think of some questions to ask the grandchildren and some for them to ask you. See Legacy Coalition Let’s Talk cards for ideas. Try to connect the questions to the Easter story, family traditions, memories, and your personal testimony. Some examples: When did Easter become very real to you? How did you celebrate Easter as a young person? What foods did you eat? What is your favorite memory? For the grandchildren ask what is their favorite part of the holiday? What do they hope to get in their Easter basket? Favorite Easter candy?
  16. Send a Puzzle in the Mail – write on scripture verses and symbols connected to Easter on one side. On the flip side write in a different color, the message He is Risen! along with a special message from you. Place it in an envelope as individual pieces so the grandchildren can put it together to discover the message.
  17. Pictionary – if you have grandchildren who like to draw and play games this is fun. Write out Easter words on index cards. Place face down in a stack and take turns choosing a card and drawing.
  18. Resurrection Tree – similar to a Jesse Tree. Gather branches, place in a vase with water. Small cards with a special word or symbol about Easter along with a corresponding scripture are hung on the branches. Allows for a time of discussion while it is being assembled. Check out Pinterest for more ideas.
  19. Scavenger Hunt – do inside or outside. Have a treat at the end. Example is “He is risen! He is no longer dead. Run real quick to look under the bed.”  If outside, could be the same clue but have it say “in the flower bed.”  Pinterest has clues already done or you could make up your own. Just tie them to the Easter story.
  20. Resurrection Scavenger Hunt – think of items that have to do with the story like a rock for the stone, a lemon/lime for sour, bread for Last supper, coins for betrayal, and 3 of something for nails. Be creative and have fun. Give them the list and allow them a set time to find as many items as they can. Gather and discuss each item.
  21. Plant Flowers – go together and purchase flowers then come home and plant. Talk about new life in Christ. Gardening tools would be a fun gift.
  22. Make a Resurrection Garden – see the internet for ideas.
  23. Easter Brunch – Recipes for Resurrection Buns or rolls are available on the internet. Make this meal special – Jesus is alive! Talk about what it would have been like for the women to find the tomb empty and realize Jesus was no longer dead.
  24. Egg Roll Race – find a hill and allow the younger grandchildren to see who can roll their egg down the hill the fastest. Older grandchildren may also like to compete.
  25. Do “You’ve Been Egged” to Grandchildren Who Live Near You – check it out on Pinterest. You could also do this with your grandchildren to a home in the community as an outreach.

Pinterest has so many more ideas including Easter Escape Room printables which would be great for the older grandchildren. There are also Minute to Win It games with an Easter theme. 

Additionally, here are Easter activities put together by our friends from Focus on the Family. There are lots of ideas to help kids understand the significance of Easter, for parents and grandparents alike! You can check it out here. While this was done for last year with covid implications, it is still great for this year.

Of course, be sure to set aside time to thank Jesus for His incredible love and sacrifice. Encourage the grandchildren to voice their prayers of thanksgiving as well. Take steps this Easter season to intentionally teach that Jesus is alive!

He is Risen! He is Risen Indeed!

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